Please note , the following texts appeared next to images of same artworks in the original exhibition catalog from 1972.
       
     
       
     
Waiting
       
     
       
     
Cock and Cunt Play
       
     
Three Women
       
     
Maintenance
       
     
The Birth Trilogy
       
     
  Please note , the following texts appeared next to images of same artworks in the original exhibition catalog from 1972.
       
     

Please note, the following texts appeared next to images of same artworks in the original exhibition catalog from 1972.

       
     
Faith Wilding, Waiting

The Living room of Womanhouse was our theatre.  The performance workship, headed by Judy Chicago, did pieces which related to the lives and activites of women.  These pieces grew out of infomal working sessions in which the women “acted out” aspects of their lives.

The first piece was called ‘Three Women.’ We explored the psyches of three “types” of women; the tough hustler, Sparkyl, the hippie chick, Rainbow, and the naive and mothering Roselyn.  Each of these women spoke about their lives.  At first, heavily made-up and adorned, they seemed amusing, ludicrous even.  Gradually, their humanity and pain began to emerge through the external “roles” in which they all were trapped in some aspect of “womanness.”

The second piece was one of two “maintenance” pieces.  Women spend a great deal of their time engaged in boring domestic activities.  The first of these “pieces” was the Ironing piece, in which a woman came out and carefully ironed a large sheet.  In the second piece, performed later in the evening, a woman scrubbed the theatre floor.  

The third piece was the “Cock and Cunt” play.  It had been written before we became involved in Womanhouse, but since it dealt with experiences common to so many people, we decided to include it.  The play is performed by two women, each wearing a plastic “part” designating their respective sex.  The women “play” man and woman, engaged in the age-old battle about domestic and sexual duties and demands.  “She wants ”him” to help her with the dishes and provide her with sexual gratification.  “he” is outraged by these demands and takes his rage out on her by killing her with his plastic phallus.  The pieces is performed in puppet-like rhythm.  

Next was the “Waiting” play, a quieter, more contemplative piece which was concerned with the passivity of women’s lives.  Faith Wilding, who wrote and performed this piece, sat in a chair, slowly rocking, while she reviewd her life from beginning to end in terms of her “waiting” for external events to determine the shape of her days. “... Waiting for him to give me pleasure... Waiting for the children to grow up and leave home ... Waiting to have some time to myself... Waiting for life to begin ... Waiting ... Waiting... Waiting...”

The last piece was entitled “The Birth Trilogy” and dealt with the birth/mothering/nurturing part of female existence.  In the first section, the women stood close together making a line with their bodies.  Using the space between their spread legs as a passageway, they gave “birth” to each other in a beautifully symbolic way.  As the “babies” emerged from the “birth canal” they lay down on the floor and then, after the mother figures” sat down, began to crawl towards them, to be picked up, held and comforted.  Finally, all the women gathered together in a circle, heads down, turned towards each other and, in an ancient ritual, began to chant and sing as the Mid-Eastern women do when they want to signal danger.  The chant grew louder and louder and brought up memories of early human life, women giving birth and, finally, at the end, reached a peak of ecstatic sound which signaled joy, freedom and release.

Waiting
       
     
Waiting

Faith Wilding

"Waiting” was a quieter, more contemplative piece which was concerned with the passivity of women’s lives.  Faith Wilding, who wrote and performed this piece, sat in a chair, slowly rocking, while she reviewd her life from beginning to end in terms of her “waiting” for external events to determine the shape of her days. “... Waiting for him to give me pleasure... Waiting for the children to grow up and leave home ... Waiting to have some time to myself... Waiting for life to begin ... Waiting ... Waiting... Waiting...”

 

       
     
"The Cock-Cunt Play"

Written by Judy Chicago, with Faith Wilding

The third piece was the “Cock and Cunt” play.  It had been written before we became involved in Womanhouse, but since it dealt with experiences common to so many people, we decided to include it.  The play is performed by two women, each wearing a plastic “part” designating their respective sex.  The women “play” man and woman, engaged in the age-old battle about domestic and sexual duties and demands.  “She wants ”him” to help her with the dishes and provide her with sexual gratification.  “he” is outraged by these demands and takes his rage out on her by killing her with his plastic phallus.  The pieces is performed in puppet-like rhythm.  

Cock and Cunt Play
       
     
Cock and Cunt Play

Written by Judy Chicago, with Faith Wilding

Three Women
       
     
Three Women

The first piece was called ‘Three Women.’ We explored the psyches of three “types” of women; the tough hustler, Sparkyl, the hippie chick, Rainbow, and the naive and mothering Roselyn.  Each of these women spoke about their lives.  At first, heavily made-up and adorned, they seemed amusing, ludicrous even.  Gradually, their humanity and pain began to emerge through the external “roles” in which they all were trapped in some aspect of “womanness.”

Maintenance
       
     
Maintenance

The second piece was one of two “maintenance” pieces.  Women spend a great deal of their time engaged in boring domestic activities.  The first of these “pieces” was the Ironing piece, in which a woman came out and carefully ironed a large sheet.  In the second piece, performed later in the evening, a woman scrubbed the theatre floor.  

The Birth Trilogy
       
     
The Birth Trilogy

The last piece was entitled “The Birth Trilogy” and dealt with the birth/mothering/nurturing part of female existence.  In the first section, the women stood close together making a line with their bodies.  Using the space between their spread legs as a passageway, they gave “birth” to each other in a beautifully symbolic way.  As the “babies” emerged from the “birth canal” they lay down on the floor and then, after the mother figures” sat down, began to crawl towards them, to be picked up, held and comforted.  Finally, all the women gathered together in a circle, heads down, turned towards each other and, in an ancient ritual, began to chant and sing as the Mid-Eastern women do when they want to signal danger.  The chant grew louder and louder and brought up memories of early human life, women giving birth and, finally, at the end, reached a peak of ecstatic sound which signaled joy, freedom and release.